1. More from The Hanging Tower. These are about 3” and >1” respectively. I’m drawing super slow today but I like the drawings, so hm.

  2. Couple lil panel previews of The Hanging Tower, from my twitter.

  3. The Hanging Tower is the story of an old knight in search of a lost girl in a run-down fantasy world, while devils, shopkeeps, and brigands trouble her quest. 28 pages, debuting at SPX, September 13th, and available online shortly after.

    The Hanging Tower is the story of an old knight in search of a lost girl in a run-down fantasy world, while devils, shopkeeps, and brigands trouble her quest. 28 pages, debuting at SPX, September 13th, and available online shortly after.

  4. kalidraws:

    Sam and I were off in Iceland this past week with the awesome Light Grey Art Lab 2014 Residency, but now we’re back AND ALSO ENGAGED!!! Photos and iceland-based art to come! (and also a wedding at some point!)

    It was a really good trip!!

  5. GATHERERS, another new one for SooJin Buzelli at PlanSponsor. This is for an article about how healthcare and retirement planning can work in unison.

    I liked all my sketches for this, though, as usual, only one of them actually works for the prompt. It usually takes me a bit to really suss out the core of the article. There’s a balance that the working sketch strikes that none of the others do.

    When these projects pop up, and I can more or less draw anything, as long as it relates back to the topic, I almost always try to exhaust whatever current topic my mind is focused on, before trying different subject matter. Last time it was knights, this time it was strange animals. 

    I usually get a lot of color advice from Kali, but she had a bigger hand in this one than usual. Pretty much steered the whole ship for a little while.

  6. That tower’s built of bad news.

Last one, I think. On to the next part.

    That tower’s built of bad news.

    Last one, I think. On to the next part.

  7. Probably she knows the danger better’n you ‘r me. But she’s squared up, so that’s about all there is.

    Probably she knows the danger better’n you ‘r me. But she’s squared up, so that’s about all there is.

  8. Shopkeep and overqualified assistant. 

    Shopkeep and overqualified assistant. 

  9. You got a mind fer crossin this bridge I’ll take whatsin the satchel. 

    You got a mind fer crossin this bridge I’ll take whatsin the satchel. 

  10. World-building in illustration

    Got any questions about world-building as it relates to illustration? General? Specific? Put ‘em in the ask box: http://sbosma.tumblr.com/ask

    I think I’m gonna write a post about it, but I’d love to hear what people are curious about as jumping-off points. Can be about specific images I’ve made or about the practice in general. I don’t really do this stuff too often, but I’ve gotten several questions and it’s something I like talking about.

    Edit: I’ll compile some questions and my thoughts and write up a thing maybe later in the week. Thanks.

  11. CRITICAL EDUCATION

    New one for SooJin Buzelli at Planadviser magazine, based on the concept of “The importance of the right training/knowledge is power.” A pretty tricky phrase to illustrate, particularly since I needed to encapsulate both of those slightly different ideas. I like all the other sketches, but this is the only one that clicks with the concept. A nice thing with SooJin’s assignments is that I often get neat sketches that I can reuse later on for personal stuff.

    Bottom is the color study, which, in some ways I prefer, but it made me too sleepy. Flashbacks of falling asleep in overly warm classrooms.

  12. An old wizard and a poor family.

  13. Polypheme and Odyssea, my combatants for Jenn Woodall’s FIGHTZINE, featuring an all-female cast of fighting game characters. These ended up being closer to Dark Souls enemies (maybe my Ornstein and Smough), but hey. 

I picture these two as invulnerable from the front and weak to the rear, with Polypheme’s shield and spear, and Odyssea’s gun keeping the player at bay. I imagine you’d get a few seconds to wail on their weaker side before being skewered on Polypheme’s flaming trident and hurled across the screen.

I knew I wanted to do a pair from the beginning, but I couldn’t really figure things out. I tried out some stuff with a tandem bow, one holding and aiming, the other drawing back the arrow, but visually it didn’t work. Things didn’t really develop until I drew Polypheme’s giant shield, and even then, it wasn’t until the shield became a face with a mouth that the pair clicks. The shield became a cyclops later, after looking at some Indian puppet masks, I think. She became Polypheme, and the other became Odyssea. The trident was a sword originally, but, Polyphemus, being the son of Poseidon, already has a link to the trident. The flaming part of the trident is a small nod to the flaming wooden stake Odysseus uses to blind the cyclops. 

I have a big reference folder full of matchlock guns from different time periods, culled from a few trips down the ol’ Google images rabbit hole, so that popped up. It seems mindlessly scanning Google images or Tumblr or whatever would just be a timesink and nothing else, but you never know. It pays off to keep track of the things you find visually stimulating, just in case.

These are two disparate examples of how I design characters — sometimes a lot of narrative choices go into the character, like in Polypheme, and sometimes it’s just a collection of interesting shapes, patterns, etc, like with Odyssea. The first is active, where I’m trying to fulfill some mental picture, the second is reactive, where I’m building the narrative after the shapes come together. They both have their merits.

I’m happy to add this piece of tonal dissonance to what is otherwise shaping up to be a very fun zine.

    Polypheme and Odyssea, my combatants for Jenn Woodall’s FIGHTZINE, featuring an all-female cast of fighting game characters. These ended up being closer to Dark Souls enemies (maybe my Ornstein and Smough), but hey. 

    I picture these two as invulnerable from the front and weak to the rear, with Polypheme’s shield and spear, and Odyssea’s gun keeping the player at bay. I imagine you’d get a few seconds to wail on their weaker side before being skewered on Polypheme’s flaming trident and hurled across the screen.

    I knew I wanted to do a pair from the beginning, but I couldn’t really figure things out. I tried out some stuff with a tandem bow, one holding and aiming, the other drawing back the arrow, but visually it didn’t work. Things didn’t really develop until I drew Polypheme’s giant shield, and even then, it wasn’t until the shield became a face with a mouth that the pair clicks. The shield became a cyclops later, after looking at some Indian puppet masks, I think. She became Polypheme, and the other became Odyssea. The trident was a sword originally, but, Polyphemus, being the son of Poseidon, already has a link to the trident. The flaming part of the trident is a small nod to the flaming wooden stake Odysseus uses to blind the cyclops. 

    I have a big reference folder full of matchlock guns from different time periods, culled from a few trips down the ol’ Google images rabbit hole, so that popped up. It seems mindlessly scanning Google images or Tumblr or whatever would just be a timesink and nothing else, but you never know. It pays off to keep track of the things you find visually stimulating, just in case.

    These are two disparate examples of how I design characters — sometimes a lot of narrative choices go into the character, like in Polypheme, and sometimes it’s just a collection of interesting shapes, patterns, etc, like with Odyssea. The first is active, where I’m trying to fulfill some mental picture, the second is reactive, where I’m building the narrative after the shapes come together. They both have their merits.

    I’m happy to add this piece of tonal dissonance to what is otherwise shaping up to be a very fun zine.

  14. Townsfolk

    Townsfolk

  15. You’d think a pretty girl ought have nicer friends.

    You’d think a pretty girl ought have nicer friends.